Police ask, PawnMaster delivers!

Posted on 22 Aug 2012

When the Police say they want help collecting more information most Pawnbrokers feel this is going to be more of a chore and take more time. Some would agree, but those elite Pawnbrokers who use PawnMaster pawn shop software would likely disagree. PawnMaster collects all of the data required for law enforcement agencies and then some. PawnMaster integrates with biometric fingerprint scanners that help clerks practically automate the process for them. With a few clicks of the button they can record fingerprints and update customers profile pictures in seconds. Those police files are then sent over in the format of preference to law enforcement including item description, pictures, etc. PawnMaster helps protect shop owners every way possible.

Below is an article about how a Texas county police chief wants pawn shop owners to collect more data. If you are concerned that your current software and/or process isn't cutting the Mustard, then it could be time to inquire about our Vendor Selection/Replacement Program.

By Jennifer Griffies

Cobb County Police want to reduce property thefts and they're asking for help from area pawn shops. Chief John Houser is asking county commissioners to force pawn shops and precious metal buyers to collect more information from sellers. Houser’s plan is to have the buyer take pictures of the seller and their items, plus collect the seller’s fingerprint digitally.

Houser tells Channel 2 Action News, all of that information could then be searched in a private database. "Those individuals who are pawning stolen items, we feel like that'll cause them to do other things than commit property crimes in Cobb County," Houser says. Some pawn shop owners say the amount of stolen merchandise makes up only a fraction of their inventory. Robert Oberth of Gold and Coin Exchange says owners can't afford to pay the equipment fees. "We're gonna have costs increase: data entry and processing fees. The 15 cents is a little bit of an overkill," said Oberth.

15 cents per transaction would likely be the charge to use the equipment. Other metro Atlanta jurisdictions that use the equipment have been able to recover stolen merchandise. The Cobb County Commission says before they can vote on the matter, the chief must come up with a specific proposal.

Jason Turner

Written by Jason Turner

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